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Track Dumpers

PostPosted: Wed Aug 10, 2016 8:58 pm
by Whatisheatnow
Has anyone knowledge or experience of the use of tracked dumpers to extract logs or firewood from wet or hilly sites? In theory a tracked dumper should eliminate the need for road construction and leave the possibility of recovering most of the cost if sold on later.There is also the option of hiring it out to other woodland owners. Several are for sale on Done Deal and such websites. The 3 ton might be a bit small so a 6 ton could be better.

Re: Track Dumpers

PostPosted: Thu Aug 11, 2016 12:42 pm
by oldclaypaws
I'd have thought driving 6 ton vehicles on hillsides is best suited to someone with experience of it, at its potentially very hazardous. Sounds like a job for a contractor, they'll have the kit and knowledge required to do it safely and efficiently. Remember that forestry is statistically the most hazardous profession, best to know your limitations.

Re: Track Dumpers

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 7:55 am
by Whatisheatnow
OK, for argument's sake, suppose the wood is level but wettish. Would a track dumper do the work of carrying out logs and firewood while keeping access open by trampling down undergrowth? Advantages would be the possibility of reselling the dumper and making a few quid by hiring it out to other owners. What might the disadvantages be if it could be parked up securely?

Re: Track Dumpers

PostPosted: Sat Aug 13, 2016 11:57 am
by oldclaypaws
The usual practice with wet ground would be fell in the winter and extract when the ground is firmer in the summer. I have heavy clay which is soft and slippy in the winter but like rock in the summer, so that's what I do with my big oaks. Excavators are more stable on slopes and wet ground as they spread the load more. Its kinda how long is a piece of string question as it'll depend just how soft and deep the wet stuff is. If its really boggy it might be a job for pulling it out with cables from a firm base at a distance. You've nothing to lose from asking a contractor to have a look, find how they'd do it, and ask for a quote. It should then be clearer what the best method is and whether you want to tackle it yourself or get in a professional. There's a big international market for stolen plant as some of it is worth tens of thousands, and lots of it 'disappears', even just bits taken off like the hydraulics and batteries, so its not something you want to leave standing around without adequate security. £800 Million worth of plant is nicked every year in the UK, so ccTV and secure premises is pretty much essential.

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Re: Track Dumpers

PostPosted: Sun Aug 14, 2016 8:45 pm
by Wendelspanswick
A tracked excavator on wet ground will be unlikely to get stuck but it will still churn the ground up, especially when skidding (turning on the spot). The National Trust wood next to us had a low ground pressure forwarder and trailer working there over the winter and it still made a mess.
Dragging the butts along will also cut the ground up and risks damaging/lowering the value of any sawlogs.
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