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Glamping

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Glamping

Postby Dexter's Shed » Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:27 pm

we held our last camping session of the year on november 2nd, invited a few friends over to celebrate the changing of the seasons and our first year (nearly) of being woodland owners, in that time we have learnt a lot, and made some really good friends in other plot holders, the only downside to the weekend, was the very uncomfortable night I had in my DD hammock, its a shame as I really do like the idea of using a hammock and tarp, but found it a little difficult getting into when your wearing a couple of layers, its very dark barring a small torch, your slightly drunk on cider,its cold etc etc, getting in aint so hard, its then getting correctly aligned in ones sleeping bag :lol:

anyhow on our return home, scrolling through evil bay, I came across this at a greatly reduced price to what I had seen, before we bought the hammocks, back then the cheapest I could find was £350, which is what drew us to two hammocks and tarps at around £150, so seeing this for the same price as the hammocks, turned me to the darkside, Im now a glamper, with a nice double blow up bed, roll on next year and a lot more weekends camping

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Re: Glamping

Postby Zathras » Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:42 am

I spent the first week of November at our woodlands too, it was great albeit somewhat muddy.

We did a whole week partly because we got the woodland late in the year so haven't been able to spend much time there yet, partly because its my birthday week so I already had the week off work and partly because we like camping and November is about as late as we like to go. That said, I'm possibly doing a night of my own this weekend for my sins.

We found the decathlon pop-up tents to be fantastic, just upgraded our quite old two seconds air to the new 2 Seconds Air XL III Illumin - it is so fast up and almost as fast down with some great features.

However we have been lusting over the nice big bell tents that you can place a stove inside, as that opens up a whole new world of opportunities for out of season camping and for putting up guests that would struggle with traditional tenting.

These guys do some amazing bell tents that will also take inner quarter and half segments.
http://www.belltent.co.uk/bell_tents/pro_bell_tent_4_metre_ultimate
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Re: Glamping

Postby Andy M » Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:08 pm

We have a bell tent and are very pleased with it.

Be careful. The first one we bought was a new 4metre one - it was "inexpensive" but when it arrived I could see why - the stiching was poor, ropes of poor quality and not good enough for camping in GB - perhaps OK as a sunshade in hotter climes. We sent it back and ended up buying a 5m one from Soulpad. They are more expensive, but seem to be of very good quality. Two years later we are very pleased. Plenty of room, but on colder nights it is better to have 3-4 people in there rather than 1-2 as the heat disappears upwards. I love being able to stand up and stretch my back!! I realised how big it was when I asked my wife for the car keys and she said "they are on the desk" - actually a camping table that we have for "dry" stuff such as books, guides, maps etc. Considering a small stove (possibly from the Windysmithy.co.uk).
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Re: Glamping

Postby Dexter's Shed » Wed Nov 27, 2013 1:41 pm

I know this will have people crying out DON'T DO IT, but on another forum I visit we had the discussion of bell tents and log burners, there's two con's to them, firstly you need to make a hole in either the side or the roof of the tent, and secondly, even full loaded with wood, the burn time is short, 4-5 hours max, so going to sleep at midnight you can wake up cold.
someone suggested PARAFFIN HEATERS/COOKERS, and of course there was the normal outcry, You'll wake up dead, but this fella went on to explain how his wife suffered very badly from the cold, that they had tried the log burners, but she was forever waking up due to the cold, once the fire burnt out, so he had started using a paraffin heater on a low setting, leaving an adjacent vent open, plus the four vents in the tents roof, and they were having good undisturbed sleep, had not died from CM poisoning etc
I therefore took the plunge and found this little (big) kiddy, not only does it blow out a good heat, but you can also remove the top plate and boil a kettle on it too, now I don't think we will need to leave it burning all night, but instant heat and a coffee in the early morning sound great
I have a week off work next week, so am toying with the idea of a December camping trip
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heater_opt.jpg
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Re: Glamping

Postby Andy M » Wed Nov 27, 2013 2:06 pm

It may seem obvious, but our solution to the cold had a lot to do with a good mattress layer rather than relying on a lilo/airbed.
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Re: Glamping

Postby oldclaypaws » Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:36 pm

Do you find camping in the wood particularly 'damp'? I notice (to partly respond to Eric's humidity thread also), that whereas my log heap in the garden at home is quite dry, a heap from the same logs in the wood is quite shiny wet. I get the idea woods are very humid / damp places- which would explain all the wonderful mosses, lichen and fungi. If so, it also asks the question, wouldn't stuff left longer term in a wood such as huts, yurts or seasoning timber also become very damp and start to rot?

Guess the reason for woods being damp might be a combined lack of air flow, leaf litter layer retaining moisture, and photosynthesising trees 'breathing' lots of water vapour via their leaves into the air... (?)
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Re: Glamping

Postby Dexter's Shed » Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:39 pm

oldclaypaws wrote:Do you find camping in the wood particularly 'damp'? I notice (to partly respond to Eric's humidity thread also), that whereas my log heap in the garden at home is quite dry, a heap from the same logs in the wood is quite shiny wet. I get the idea woods are very humid / damp places- which would explain all the wonderful mosses, lichen and fungi. If so, it also asks the question, wouldn't stuff left longer term in a wood such as huts, yurts or seasoning timber also become very damp and start to rot?

Guess the reason for woods being damp might be a combined lack of air flow, leaf litter layer retaining moisture, and photosynthesising trees 'breathing' lots of water vapour via their leaves into the air... (?)



perhaps this would have been better suited posted in Eric's question, rather than a glamping post, starts getting a bit muddly otherwise
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Re: Glamping

Postby Zathras » Wed Nov 27, 2013 7:52 pm

Dexter's Shed wrote:?.. You'll wake up dead, but this fella went on to explain how his wife suffered very badly from the cold, that they had tried the log burners, but she was forever waking up due to the cold, once the fire burnt out, so he had started using a paraffin heater on a low setting, leaving an adjacent vent open, plus the four vents in the tents roof, and they were having good undisturbed sleep, had not died from CM poisoning etc ...


Yeah, you raised the two key points - firstly stoves don't last all night for heating, though I wouldn't plan to provide heat exclusively with the stove. Secondly the CM isssue, and lets face it - you only need to make a mistake once in that regard.

The heater I have for enclosed spaces is the Bluecat which should be a clean burn, although I do ensure there is some ventilation.

For my trip this weekend on my own, it is small tent all the way which is much better for heat retention and planning to use a 3 candle UCO secured in the porch (which is between inner and outer skins), with the 9 hour standard or 15 hour beeswax it should keep the chill out all night and keep my hot chocolate hot!
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Re: Glamping

Postby Zathras » Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:08 pm

Andy M wrote:It may seem obvious, but our solution to the cold had a lot to do with a good mattress layer rather than relying on a lilo/airbed.


Spot on!
The best quote I've heard is - "one layer on the bottom is worth three on the top"

We have some thermarests which are much better than standard airbeds, and use some basic silver camp mats under those for added comfort in colder times.
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Re: Glamping

Postby SimonFisher » Wed Nov 27, 2013 8:52 pm

Andy M wrote:It may seem obvious, but our solution to the cold had a lot to do with a good mattress layer rather than relying on a lilo/airbed.

Zathras wrote:We have some thermarests which are much better than standard airbeds

Two Thermarest Dreamtime XLs, one on top of the other, Egyptian cotton fitted sheet and down duvet ... extremely comfortable and no problem with cold whatsoever. ;-)
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