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Foraging

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Foraging

Postby smojo » Sun May 11, 2014 10:04 am

Just have to tell you about my Foraging day out. It was a gift from my daughter. Fantastic. I have read several books about food for free and foraging for plants but not had the confidence to try any of it. The day was fantastic. A couple who own their own 18 acre wood - he is a chef, so there was plenty of advice as to what you can do with the food when you've picked it. What I realised is how important and helpful it is to get first hand knowledge of the plants in identifying them correctly. Books don't allow you feel or smell or taste the plants and that makes a huge difference to your ability to correctly identify them. I was amazed at how many (often common) plants are actually edible and some of the surprising flavours (wood sorrel tastes like Bramley apples, the young buds of ribwort plantain, like mushrooms.) During the day we had several trips into the woods to identify plants. We did some simple cooking making a pesto and baking some flatbreads in their clay oven which we ate with some delicious soup. If you have any interest in using wild plants from your own woods or the wayside I thoroughly recommend going on one of these courses. You'll come away with at least ten times your previous knowledge. I haven't been asked to plug this couple's enterprise but I'm going to give you a link to it anyway.

http://www.tastethewild.co.uk/
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Re: Foraging

Postby Tarrel » Mon Jun 16, 2014 7:51 pm

Just picked up these Peppery Boletes from our wood this afternoon. Looking forward to putting them in a curry. They'll blow your head off!

Image
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Re: Foraging

Postby oldclaypaws » Mon Jun 16, 2014 9:10 pm

The big one on the left looks like a boletus chrysenteron, which in terms of eating is widely described as 'slimy and tasteless'.

Although Boletii are supposed to be good eating, can't say I'm blown away by them. Compared to really tasty mushies; Parasols, blewitts, oyster + inkcaps, I find them rather bland and 'foamy' texture.
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Re: Foraging

Postby Tarrel » Mon Jun 16, 2014 9:17 pm

No, it's a peppery bolete. Trick of the light. I just had a look. The cap is actually much darker than the picture suggests, the pores have the same "walnut brown" colour as the others and the stem is yellow inside. And I just ran my finger over the pores and tasted it. Yep, it's peppery! :shock:
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Re: Foraging

Postby smojo » Tue Jun 17, 2014 7:56 am

They look great. Looking forward to finding something I can eat in my woods. I'd like to get some first hand experience at identifying though. Got a good book but you can't feel or smell them photos. We didn't cover fungi on our foraging day - probably not much about in May.
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Re: Foraging

Postby Bulworthy Project » Tue Jun 17, 2014 6:39 pm

One bolete is so different from another. The Scarletina is one of our favourite mushrooms and the Cep is delicious as well. Others are not so good. Not tried the peppery bolete.
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